GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

   

Gujarat Board GSEB Textbook Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources Textbook Questions and Answers, Additional Important Questions, Notes Pdf.

Heritage of India Class 10 GSEB Solutions Social Science Chapter 9

Gujarat Board Class 10 Social Science Forests and Wildlife Resources Textbook Questions and Answers

I. Write the following questions in detail.

Question 1.
Write a detailed note on types afforest.
Answer:
Types of forests according to administration:

  1. Reserved Forests: The forests where government puts restriction on cutting and collecting wood as well as on pasturing are known as reserved forests. Such forests are under the direct control of the government.
  2. Protected Forests: The forests where local people are permitted to collect the wood and to graze their animals without causing any harm to the trees are called protected forests. These forests are under the control of local administration.
  3. Unclassified Forests: These types of forests are still not classified. So, there is no restriction on deforestation or animal grazing.

Go through these Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources Class 10 GSEB Notes to score well in your exam.

Types of forests according to ownership, administration and management:

  1. State Forest: Most of the forests of the country fall under this category. The Central or the State Government controls such forests.
  2. Communal Forests: Local self-government, institutions like gram panchayat, municipalities, municipal corporations, district panchayat, etc. have control over such forests.
  3. Private Forests: Forest land owned by individuals is called private forest. These types of forests are found more in Odisha, Meghalaya, Punjab and Himachal Pradesh. Some of the forests of here are in haphazard condition whereas some of them are totally barren.

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

Question 2.
State the remedies for forest conservation.
Answer:
Following are the Remedies for Forest Conservation:
(i) Research should be carried out to find the alternative of wood. This will reduce the usage of wood and hence, forests. In case if the trees are to be cut for development activities then new trees of the same species should be planted. Cutting of trees that have not grown fully should be banned.

(ii) Industries that directly receive their raw material from the forests should be enforced to grow trees to prevent to future dearth. Although eco-tourism should be encouraged but, it should be strictly taken care that the forests do not get damaged due to these tourism activities.

(iii) Public awareness programmes should be organized among the local people and effort should be made to reach maximum people.

(iv) The importance of fofest and ways to conserve them should be included in school and college syllabus.

(v) Social forestry and agro-forestry should be developed intensively by taking planned steps for the necessity of fodder and firewood. In place of firewood, alternative options like solar energy, natural gas, etc. should be brought in use.
(vi) Forest resource should be used judiciously. Infected trees should be either cured or if not possible removed so that the infection does not spread. This will also increase the health and speed of growth.

(vii) Forest fire cause heavy damage to forests. Hence, a separate special force should be formed at national level to do use the forest fires.

(viii) The transport has become quite fast and comfortable now. So, the number of people going on pilgrimage has increased drastically. These people visit religious places in forest area to attend the bhandara, fairs or the parikramma. They leave a lot of litter behind. This litter should be prevented. Also, it should be cleaned properly and regularly to prevent forests from getting polluted.

(ix) Some part of forest areas should be systematically reserved for animal pasture.

Question 3.
Describe various projects for wildlife protection.
Answer:
Under Wildlife Protection Scheme, The government has started several projects to protect wildlife. Some of these projects are especially for those animals which are either in danger or may get extinct in near future.

The Projects are discussed below:
1. Project Tiger: As per an estimate, there were more than 40,000 tigers in India in the beginning of 20th century. At that time there were no strict laws on hunting tigers or cutting trees from forests. The unrestricted illegal hunting and deforestation posed a major danger for the existence of tigers. Hence, in order to save tigers, the government started Project Tiger in 1971. Under the project, the government took several steps to protect natural habitat of tigers and to maintain ecological balance at national level. Till now this project is implemented in about 44 regions of India.

2. Project Elephant: This project was started in 1992. The main aim of this project was to protect elephants in their natural habitacts and to protect their migratory corridors. Due to constant effort of the government today, the number of elephants has increased considerably. Today, there are about 26 protection zones for elephants in India. Over and above protecting elephants of the forest this project also works for the protection and proper care of domesticated elephants.

3. Project Rhino: It was started for protecting One-Horned Rhino of India. In India most of the rhinos are found in Sunderbans, West Bengal. Under the ‘Rhino Vision 2020’, the government has targeted to increase the number of rhino to 3000.

4. Project Crocodile: In the decade of 1970, the species of alligators found in freshwater was on the verge of extinction. At that time the Government of India started this project and saved this species.

5. Project Vulture: Vulture is said to be the ‘cleaner of the nature’. It eats the meat of dead animals and this way keeps the nature clean. There are about 9 sub-species of vulture in India. This project was started in 2004 when their number started decreasing drastically.

6. Project Snow Leopard: This animal is found at an altitude of about 3000 metres in Himalayas. As the name suggests it is found only in the snowy region. This project was started in 2000 with the objective of increasing the knowledge about snow leopard among the local people, so the people would become aware and protect it.

7. Other Projects: Besides these projects the government has-also started projects like Kashmiri Hangool Project, Red Panda Project, Manipur-Tamil Project for the special species of deer found in Manipur, Ganga-Dolphin Project on Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers, etc.

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

II. Answer in brief.

Question 1.
What is meant by bio-reserve zone?
Answer:
Biosphere reserve or Bio-reserve is a very large area of land which may cover multiple National Parks, Sanctuaries and Reserves as well. It is established as per international norms. The purpose of bio-reserve is to protect the physical and cultural diversity of a region. The bio-reserve also protects insects, birds and animals, land of that area and even the life style of the people living there.

The government conducts programmes for encouraging research and training about bio-reserve. No external human movement is allowed in a bio-reserve. The average area of such zone is more than 5000 sq. kilometres. Nilgiri, Gulf of Mannar, Great Nicobar, Sundarban, Pnachmadhi, etc. are important bio-reserves of India. The Rann of Kachchh of Gujarat was declared as a bio-reserve zone in 2008.

Question 2.
Where would, we find tigers in Gujarat ?
Answer:
In the pasts tigers could be seen in the forests of Idar, Ambaji and Danta in Gujarat.

Question 3.
State the reason for forests destruction.
Answer:
Forests get destroyed in two ways.
They are
(a) Natural reasons; and
(b) Man-made reasons. The rate of natural destruction of forests in quite less compared to that by man-made reasons.

The main reasons are :
Cutting of forests by humans for their own benefits. Human greed to gain more land.

  • To build cannals and multipurpose projects.
  • To make roads, airports and railways.
  • To do farming.
  • Cutting trees for jhoom farming (shifting agriculture).
  • To get raw materials for industries. To get wood for construction.
  • To expand & develop cities and towns.
  • To build new industries. Cutting trees for jhoom farming (shifting agriculture)

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

Question 4.
Write notes about the wildlife on the verge of extinction.
Answer:
Today many wild animals of the world are on the verge of extinction. A few of them have been become extinct. In the last century, tigers were found throughout India. One could see tigers even in Gujarat in the forests of Idar, Ambaji and Danta. Today, the have become completely extinct from Gujarat. Cheetah is also becoming extinct from Indian forests. Many species for birds which were very easily seen in Indian forests are now hardly seen. Birds like vulture, duck with pink throat, cranes and owls are on the verge of extinction. Chilotro bird which was once found in abundance in Arunachal Pradesh is hard to find today.

The fresh water alligators and Ganga River dolphins are on the verge of extinction. The number of sea turtles that used to r come to the coasts of Odisha and Gujarat is Constantly decreasing. Water-fowls (Jalbiladi) once found ‘ frequently in Narmada, Tapi, Mahi and Sabarmati rivers of Gujarat are almost extinct. Looking such a condition of dwindling wildlife, it is utmost necessary that we make concrete effort to save what is left. Reasons for the destruction of wildlife Human interference in grasslands and in watershed area of the forests has increased. This has put natural habitat of the wild animals in danger. Destruction of forests in the main reason for natural imbalance. When natural imbalance takes place the number of wild animals decrease.

Hunting the animals to obtain hair, skin (hide), bones, horns or nails is also responsible for reduction of wildlife. To fulfil his greed and need, man exploits forests to his maximum capacity. He keeps on building, roads, multi-purpose projects, mining minerals, expanding new settlements, etc. Thus, man has entered forests, cut them and has displaced wild animals. Forest fire is another reason in which several animals, birds and insects die.

When the forest fire occurs at the procreative time of animals or the time of hatching of eggs, it creates a very adverse effect on the number of wild animals in the forest. Due to the loss of their natural habitats animals become homeless. Hence, they enter into areas of human dwellings and even attack them and their domestic animals. To this humans attack wild animals and also kill them many a times. Humans also hunt animals to make certain medicines, perfume, etc. This also reduces their number.

III. Answer the following questions in brief.

Question 1.
What is meant by a Sanctuary?
Answer:
A wildlife sanctuary is quite similar to a national park, except that local people living there can continue living and the human activities are permitted. A wildlife sanctuary is basically established for protecting some specific species. Domesticated animals are allowed to graze after obtaining permission from the authorities. For example, Gir, Periyar, Chandraprabha, Eturnagaram, etc. are famous sanctuaries.

Question 2.
What is National Park?
Answer:
A national park is a forest area and if need be the surrounding areas as notified by the government established for the protection and propagation of the flora and fauna of the area. National Parks do not allow any human activities inside the marked area of national park. In this regard, it is more protected zone compared to the sanctuary.

Unlike a sanctuary, it is not centered around one species. Hence, we can find more than one ecosystem in a national park. There is complete ban on animal grazing. It is established through the coordination of state and central government. Kaziranga, Corbett, Velavadar, Marine National Park, Gir, Dachigam, etc. are important National Parks.

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

Question 3.
In which state is the Nal Sarovar located?
Answer:
Nal Sarovar is located in Gujarat State.

IV. Select the correct option from the options given for each questions and write the answer:

Question 1.
Which wildlife has became extinct from Gujarat
(a) Ghudkhar
(b) Bear
(c) Tiger
(d) Leopard
Answer:
(c) Tiger

Question 2.
Forests over which the local self-government institutions (Gram Panchayat, Municipality, Municipal Corporation) have control
(a) Village forests
(b) Sanctuary forest
(c) Collective community forest
(d) Jhoom forest
Answer:
(c) Collective community forest

Question 3.
How many species of animals and birds are there in the world?
(a) Twelve lakh
(b) Twenty-one lakh
(c) Seven lakh
(d) Fifteen lakh
Answer:
(d) Fifteen lakh

Gujarat Board Class 10 Social Science Forests and Wildlife Resources Additional Important Questions and Answers

I. Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

Question 1.
Which of the following statements is related to forest is NOT true?
(a) In reserved forests there is restriction on cutting and collection of woods.
(b) In protected forest local people are permitted to collect the wood and to graze their animals without causing any harm to the trees.
(c) Communal forests owned by individuals.
(d) There is no restriction on cutting of trees or animals grazing in unclassified forest.
Answer:
(c) Communal forests owned by individuals.

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

Question 2.
Which of the following statements is not correct?
(a) India stand 12th in the world in terms of bio-diversity.
(b) There are 1 Bio-reserve region, 4 National Parks and 23 Sanctuaries located in Gujarat.
(c) There is a danger of survival to the waterfalls seen at the sea coast of Kachchh.
(d) There are about 15 lakh species of birds and animals and out of these 81251 species are found in India.
Answer:
(c) There is a danger of survival to the waterfalls seen at the sea coast of Kachchh.

Question 3.
Which of the following animals are included in bio-diversity of India. Find the correct option.
(1) Black bear
(2) Kangaroo
(3) Penguin
(4) One-homed Rhino
(a) 1 and 4
(b) 2 and 4
(c) 3 and 4
(d) Only 3
Answer:
(a) 1 and 4

Question 4.
Which animals are found at distinguished altitudes on Himalayas and in cold forests?
(a) Snow Leopard
(b) Ostrich
(c) Red Panda
(d) (a) and (c) both
Answer:
(d) (a) and (c) both

Question 5.
Which of the following statements are correct during class discussion of students about forest conservation?
(a) Prashwa: Total ban should be f imposed on cutting of immature trees.
(b) Nancy: For the requirement of fuel the cheaper resource atomic energy alternative should be used in place of wood.
(c) Parth: Nationalism should be developed intensively by taking planned steps for the necessity of
fodder and firewood.
(d) Raaz: The trees which are necessary to be cut for construction work for the necessity, new plants should be grown in place of them.
Answer:
(d) Raaz: The trees which are necessary to be cut for construction work for the necessity, new plants should be grown in place of them.

Question 6.
One pair is not correct.
(a) Red Panda: Cold forests of eastern Himalayas.
(b) Aquatic Gange Dolphin: Ganga of India – Brahmaputra – species of t sweet riverwater.
(c) 1971: Project Tiger.
(d) 1992 : Project vulture.
Answer:
(a) Red Panda: Cold forests of eastern Himalayas.

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

Question 7.
1992 : Project Elephant, 1971:
(a) Project Red Panda
(b) Project Rhino
(c) Toject Tiger
(d) Project Crocodile
Answer:
(b) Project Rhino

Question 8.
One pair is not correct.
(a) One homed Indian Rhino – Assam
(b) Species of Alligator – Project Crocodile
(c) Project Vulture – 2004
(d) Leopard – Natural habitat Africa continent
Answer:
(a) One homed Indian Rhino – Assam

Question 9.
Select the correct option regarding location of wildlife preservation from East to West direction.
(1) Gir National Park
(2) Panchmadhi Bioreserve region
(3) Sunderban Bioreserve region
(4) Kaziranga National Park
(a) 2, 3, 1, 4
(b) 4, 3, 2, 1
(c) 4, 3, 1, 2
(d) 3, 4, 2, 1
Answer:
(b) 4, 3, 2, 1

Question 10.
Which of the following statements is applicable to unclassified forests?
(a) These forests are under direct control of the government.
(b) Here, there is no restrictions on cutting of wood or grazing of cattle.
(c) These forests belong to individuals or families.
(d) These forests are controlled by local self-government institutions.
Answer:
(b) Here, there is no restrictions on cutting of wood or grazing of cattle.

I. Very Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1.
What is the simple meaning of forest?
Answer:
The simple meaning of forest is the accumulation of trees, scrubs, and heap of grass.

Question 2.
Mention the types of forests on the basis of administration.
Answer:
Forests are classified into three types on the basis of ownership, administration and management:

  1. State Forest
  2. Communal Forest
  3. Private Forest

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

Question 3.
What is deforestation? How does it take place?
Answer:
The destruction of forests is called deforestation. The causes of deforestation are us under:

  1. Naturally
  2. Interference of human.

Question 4.
How many different species of birds and animals are found in the world. How many of them are found in India?
Answer:
There are about 15 lakh species of birds and animals in the world. Out of them, about 81,251 species are found in India.

Question 5.
Animals from which continents are fond in India ?
Answer:
Animals from Asia, Europe and Africa are found in India.

Question 6.
Which African animals are found in India?
Answer:
African animals like hyena and chinkara (one type of deer) are found in India.

Question 7.
Which European animals are found in India?
Answer:
European animals like wolves, wild goats and Kashmiri deer are found in India.

Question 8.
Which Asian animals are found in India ?
Answer:
Asian animals like elephants, gibbons are found in India.

Question 9.
Where does India stand in the world in terms of bio-diversity?
Answer:
India stands 12th in the world in terms of bio-diversity.

Question 10.
Where do migrating birds come to India in winter?
Answer:
Migrating birds from distant places come to the watershed areas of Keoladev and Bharatpur in Rajasthan and Nalsarovar in Gujarat.

Question 11.
Where were tigers seen in Gujarat in the past?
Answer:
In the past, tigers were seen in the forests of Idar, Ambaji, Panchmahal and Dang.

Question 12.
Which birds are on the verge of extinctint in India?
Answer:
Birds like vulture, pink throated duck, cranes, owls and chilotra are on the verge of extinction in India.

Question 13.
Where was the bird ‘Chilotro’ seen in a large number in India ?
Answer:
Birds like vulture, pink throated duck, It was found in a large number in Arunachal Pradesh in India.

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

Question 14.
Why has wildlife protection scheme been implemented?
Answer:
Wildlife protection scheme has been implemented for those animal species which are in danger or which are likely to be extincted in near future.

Question 15.
Name some of the famous sanctuaries of India.
Answer:
Periyar, Chandraprabha, Etumagaram etc. are some of the famous sanctuaries of India.

Question 16.
Name some famous National Parks of India.
Answer:
Kaziranga, Corbett, Velvadar, Marine National Park, Gir, Dachigam etc. are some famous national parks of India.

Question 17.
Name some famous bio-reserves of India.
Answer:
Nilgiri, Gulf of Mannar, Great Nicobar, Sunderban, Panchmadhi, etc. are famous bio-reserves of India.

Question 18.
Which place of Gujarat was declared as bio-reserve? When and Why ?
Answer:
The Rann of Kachchh of Gujarat was declared as bio-reserve in 2008 for the protection of its special environmental conditions.

Question 19.
Mention the total number of Sanctuaries, National Parks and Bio-reserves in India and in Gujarat:
Answer:

Sanctuaries National Parks Bio-reserves,
India 531 103 18
Gujarat 23 04 01

III. Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1.
Define forest and virgin vegetation.
Answer:
The large collection of trees, shrubs or grass growing over a region is called a forest. The natural vegetation which can raise itself naturally without the help of man is called virgin vegetable. Today, in India, virgin vegetation exists only in Himalayas, Sunderban and remote areas of Thar Desert.

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources

Question 2.
Give a general classification of forest with the help of chart.
Answer:
GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources 3

Question 3.
Pilgrimage causes pollution of forests.
Answer:
Modern-day transport has become quite fast and comfortable. So, the number of people going on pilgrimage has increased drastically. These people visit religious places in forest area to attend the Bhandara, fairs or the parikrama. They leave a lot of litter behind. There are no proper laws and rules for stopping the litter. These activities pollute the forests.

Question 4.
India has a very diverse wildlife. Give reason.
Answer:
India’s climate and physiography is highly diverse. We have Himalayan regions where there is deep snow and on the other hand deserts like Rajasthan and Kachchh which are extremely hot. Similarly, we have a very long coastline. Majority of India consists of plains. Such a large geographical diversity has resulted in a large variation in insects, birds, animals and vegetation among various regions of India. India is home to 81,251 species of animals and birds. Also, it stands 12th in the world in terms of bio-diversity. Animals from as far as Asia, Europe and Africa are found in India. Hence, we can rightly say that India has a very diverse wildlife.

Question 5.
Give an introduction about the red panda.
Answer:
Red Panda is found in the cold forests of eastern Himalayas. It is also found in China, Nepal, Bhutan and Myanmar. It mainly survives by eating bamboo sprouts, eggs, small birds, insects, etc. It is less active during the day.

Question 6.
Write a short note on Ganges River Dolphin.
Answer:
Ganges River Dolphin is a type of freshwater river dolphin found in India Nepal and Bangladesh. In India, it is found in river Brahmaputra and Ganga. A few dolphins are also found in Chambal river. Generally, it lives in the river which is deep and calm. Although, Ganga is deep and calm at various places but it flows through India which is one of the densely populated regions of the world. India releases a very large amount of dirty water in the river.

Moreover, sedimentation due to deforestation, fisheries, navigation in the river, release of industrial waste, etc. have together caused severe danger to the extinction of these dolphins. These dolphins come to the surface quite frequently for breathing. While breathing they make ‘suu-suu’ type sound. Due to this typical sound that it makes this dolphin is also known as ‘sauns’, ‘susu’ and ‘suis’. At present, the existence of Ganga River Dolphin is a danger.

Question 7.
State the names of various projects started under Wildlife Protection Scheme of the government.
Answer:
Under the Wildlife Protection Scheme, the government has started several projects to protect wildlife. Some of these projects are especially for those animals which are either in danger or may get extinct in near future.
The main projects are:

  1. Project Tiger,
  2. Project Elephant,
  3. Project Rhino,
  4. Project Crocodile,
  5. Project Vulture and
  6. Project Snow Leopard.

Besides these projects, the government has also started projects like Kashmiri Hangool Project, Red Panda Project, Manipur-Tamil Project for the special species of deer found in Manipur, Ganga-Dolphin project on Ganga and Brahmaputra rivers etc.

Question 8.
Planned development can save forests and wildlife. Give reason.
Answer:
As the population grows and the world expands economic development also increases. Development is inevitable for a country’s economy. However, it is important to see that development does not destroy wildlife and nature. The government should make very strict laws and regulations to see that the amount of nature or forest . destroyed is somehow restored. If cutting of trees of essential for development, new trees should be grown.

Plans should be made for stopping human interference in areas where wildlife is getting extinct. Giving high priority in growth and maintenance of nature, ecosystem and animals in our planning process can save forests and wildlife. Developmental process is inevitable. But along with it, it is necessary that we keep in mind its ill effects on the entire life system and planning.

Question 9.
Loss of one species is a great loss to the entire food chain. Give reason.
Answer:
Every organism in the food chain has a specific role. Loss of even one species disturbs the entire structure. For example, caterpillars eat leaves, chameleons eat caterpillars, snakes eat chameleons and eagles eats snakes. So, if caterpillars become extinct then chameleon will have to feed on other organisms. This will cause pressure on that species and pose danger for its extinction as it now consumed more. Thus, loss of one species breaks the food chain in the long run. Man is also part of food chain and hence, the effect of one species will ultimately affect him too. Hence, loss of one species is a great loss to the entire food chain.

Question 10.
It is our moral duty to protect and preserve wildlife. Give reason.
Answer:
Wildlife is destroyed by human activities and forest fire. Man does hunting as a part of his hobby, for adventure or to earn by selling animal products. Many animals have become extinct or are on the verge of extinction due to all these activities. Wildlife is also disturbed due to pollution, industrialization, urbanization and noise of vehicles and machines.

Wildlife is a part of nature and it plays a very important role in balancing the ecosystem. Hence, it is very important to protect and preserve wildlife.

IV. Long Answer Type Questions

Question 1.
Explain deforestation and discuss its impacts.
Answer:
The destruction of forests is called deforestation. It is a global problem. Natural calamities such as forest fire, flood and drought, etc. may destroy forests naturally. On the other hand, as man progresses and the nation develops the forests get cut. This is a man-made reason for deforestation. The rate of natural destruction of forests is quite less compared to manmade reasons.

Impact of deforestation Deforestation causes very far reaching effects. It increases the quantity of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Greenhouse effect becomes more severe. Soil erosion takes place and farm fertility deteriorates. The forests of peninsular India have mainly decreased due to deforestation. Due to deforestation many living organisms have lost their abodes. Moreover, with increasing population, the areas of humans are expanding and merging . with forests. As a result, the wild animals have started entering urban settlements in search of food and water. Carnivorous animals entering human areas and killing them and their domestic animals has become quite common now.

Question 2.
Write a short note on the diverse wildlife found in India.
Answer:
India’s climate and physiography is highly diverse. We have Himalayan regions where there is deep snow and on the other hand deserts like Rajasthan and Kachchh which are extremely hot. Similarly, we have a very long coastline. Majority of India consists of plains. Such a large geographical diversity has resulted in a large variation in insects, birds, animals, and vegetation among various regions of India. There are about 15 lakh species of animals and birds in the world. Out of these, 81,251 species are found in India.

India stands 12th in the world in terms of bio-diversity. Animals from as far as Asia, Europe and Africa are found in India. Animals such as African Zarakh, European wolves, Wild goats and Kashmiri Deer, Elephants and Gibbons from South-east Asia, etc. can be seen in India. Moreover, black bear, one- homed rhino, deer, different types of snakes, peacocks, ghora (bustard), hawk, kingfisher, flamingo, etc. are also found in India. The snow leopard and red panda both are found at same altitude in Himalayas but have very distinguished characteristics.

Today, India is the only country in the world where one can find tigers and lions moving in their natural abodes. During winter, migratory birds from distant places visit the watershed area of Keoladev National Park, Bharatpur and Nal Sarovar in Gujarat. Sea turtless come to lay eggs along the sandy coasts of Odisha. Indian pythons, various types of snakes and the King Cobra are found in the southern rainforests.

Question 3.
How can we preserve wildlife? Discuss.
Answer:
We can preserve wildlife by taking following measures:
The biggest change needed to preserve the wildlife is to change our attitude towards forests. We consider forests as a source of unlimited in come and so keep on exploiting them to the maximum capacity. We need to understand that forest resources are limited and hence must be preserved. Wildlife will be saved only if their natural habitats i.e. forests are saved. The balance between the number of herbivores and the carnivores in the forests should be maintained. Active steps like maintaining the water sources in the forests and restricting the grazing of domestic animals in forests should be taken to maintain this balance.

Strict laws should be heavily punished for illegal mining in forest, area. Animals should not be disturbed during their procreative period. Necessary arrangements should be made to see that human interference does not occur in such times. The effects of fisheries, forest gatherings or tourism on the forests should be made in the rules and laws. Programmes should be arranged to bring awareness in the society regarding the importance of forests and wildlife. If the wildlife protection force is inactive, then the force should be pressurized to give priority to wildlife and forest protection.

Question 4.
Give a brief introduction about Leopard, Cheetah and One-Homed Rhino.
Answer:
Leopard: It belongs to cat family. It is a small animal compared to other members of cat family like lions and tigers. It is found everywhere in India. It is also found in dark black colour. It is found in large number in the forests of Gujarat. It often enters into human settlements. At times, people mistake it as Cheetah.

Cheetah: It belongs to cat family. It has become totally extinct from Indian forests. So, today in India we can see Cheetah only in zoo. One can find Cheetah in its natural habitat in Africa. One-Horned Indian Rhino: It is found in the marshy regions of Brahmaputra and Sunderbans. It is hunted for preparing medicine from its horns. It is an herbivorous animal. The government made strong efforts and so now it is protected and as a result its number is rising.

Question 5.
Give a brief introduction about animals like henotaro and Dugang.
Answer:
Henotaro: It is an animal which lives in the arid and semi-arid regions having alkaline forests and grasslands, desert or semi-desert areas. It is found in the Greater and Smaller Rann of Kachchh of Gujarat, Banni and in Narayan Sarovar Sanctuaries. It is slightly taller than the fox, has fleshy round mouth and long high ears. It hunts smaller birds and animals for it food. Its existence can be known by its footprints.

Dugang: It is an aquantic animal. It is seen in very small number along the western sea coast of India. It is also found along the sea coasts of east Africa, south-east coast of Asia and northern coast of Australia. It feeds on sea grass and vegetation. At times, it also eats aquatic animals. People hunt dugang in large number for its meat and fat. Earlier dugang could be seen frequently along the coast of Gujarat, especially along coast of Saurashtra coast. But today, it is rarely seen there.

V. Fill in the blanks

1. There are ……………. bio-reserve zones in India.
2. There are …………….. national parks in India.
3. A special aquatic animal ………………. is found along the northern coast of Australia.
4. The Rann of Kachchh of Gujarat was declared as a bio-reserve zone in ……………. for the protection of its special environmental condition.
5. There are …………….. national parks in Gujarat.
Answer:
1.18
2. 103
3. Dugang
4.2008
5. 4

VI. Write whether the following statements are true or false.

1. The population of Henotaro is found in Narayan Sarovar Sanctuary.
2. There are total 103 Sanctuaries in Gujarat.
3. Bio-reserve zones are formed according to international norms.
4. There are total 531 National Park in India.
5. National Parks are established through the coordination of State and Central Government.
Answer:
1. True
2. False
3. True
4. False
5. True

VII. Match the following

GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources 1
Answer:
1. (d)
2. (c)
3. (b)
4. (a)

VIII. Identify me

1. I am considered to be freshwater species of alligators.
2. I am considered as worker of cleanliness of nature.
3. I am considered as national park located at Bharatpur.
4. I am considered as watershed region of Gujarat.
5. I am considered as national park of Assam.
Answer:
1. Crocodile
2. Vulture
3. Keoladev
4. Nal Sarovar
5. Kaziranga

IX. Map-Based Question
On an outline map of India show the wildlife reserves.
GSEB Solutions Class 10 Social Science Chapter 9 Forests and Wildlife Resources 2

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