GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

   

Gujarat Board GSEB Class 11 English Textbook Solutions Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together Textbook Exercise Important Questions and Answers, Notes Pdf.

Gujarat Board Textbook Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

GSEB Class 11 English We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together Text Book Questions and Answers

List the steps taken by the Captain:
Question 1.
to protect the ship when rough weather began.
Answer:
Gordon Cook set sail in 1976. He had built for himself a huge boat and called it ‘Wavewalker’. The journey was to be 2,55,000 km. On second of January 1977, while they were in the southern Indian Ocean, about 3500 km from Cape Town, the weather suddenly became terrible. The sea became stormy. The ship was caught in the stormy sea.

It rose to the top of each wave. The captain had taken various steps to protect themselves from the fury of the storm. First of all he had dropped down the jib (small sail) to slow down the speed. He secured everything tightly with ropes. He attached lifelines to the life-rafts. Then he made everyone to put on their oilskins and life jackets. These precautionary measures later proved to be insufficient.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 2.
to check the flooding of the water in the ship.
Answer:
At 6 p.m. on second January 1977 it appeared that the storm had calmed down. The wind stopped blowing and the sky grew dark. A roaring sound was heard. A huge cloud was seen closing on the ship. But the cloud turned out to be a huge wave. By the time it approached the ship the roaring transformed into a thunder. The torrent of water exploded on the deck.

There was water everywhere on the ship. It had entered the lower parts of the ship. The captain went down to find Lary and Herb trying to pump out the water. He plugged the big hole from where the water was gushing in. Debris floating around the cabins had blocked the hand pumps. Only one electric pump was in working order. He connected it tp the out-pipe- and it started working. With these efforts he was able to check the flooding of water in the ship.

Question 3.
Describe the mental condition of the voyagers on January 4 and 5.
Answer:
Frustration was written in bold letters on the faces of the voyagers. Ceaseless efforts had brought very little relief to them. But they did not lose hopes. They had been pumping out the accumulated water for the last 36 hours. A few centimetres of water was still left. Because of the strong wind no sail could be put on the main mast. If they did the pressure could further damage the ship. So they hoisted only the storm jib. They tried to head towards the direction of the two islands. That day they had their first meal in almost two days.

Hopes of survival were almost nil as black clouds began to build up, the wind became stormy and the waves rose higher. On January 5 the situation became worse. The weather was horrible. Frustration again dominated. Gordon Cook went to comfort the children. Jon asked his father if they were going to die. He tried to assure him that they would succeed in their efforts. Jon told him if they could be together they were not afraid of death. Listening to the words of the child Gordon regained courage. His determination to fight the storm became stronger. The following day the Wavewalker had overcome the storm. The wind had eased. Hopes of survival were revived.

Question 4.
Describe the shifts in the narration of the events as indicated in the three sections of the text. Give a subtitle to each section.
Answer:
1. Planning the voyage :
Gordon Cook had taken his inspiration of round the world voyage from captain James Cook who had completed this feat 200 years before. To fulfil his dream Gordon had spent 16 years on sharpening his seafaring skills. He had built a wooden boat, ‘Wavewalker’, which was 23 metres, weighing 30 tons. He had spent months fitting and testing it in the roughest weather they could find. They had planned a voyage which would last 3 years and cover a distance of 2,55,000 kilometres.

2. The Christmas tree:
Gordon Cook, along with his family and two crewmen set sail in July 1976 from Plymouth, England. The first part of the journey passed pleasantly. They had sailed down to Cape Town. They were now entering the roughest sea. It was southern Indian Ocean. Strong winds began to blow. On December 25, 1976 they were 3500 km east of Cape Town. Though the weather was bad, they had a Christmas tree and celebrated Christmas in a wonderful way.

3. The storm:
On January 2, 1977 there were huge waves. They could put up only a small sail in front of their ship. They secured everything tightly with ropes. At 6 p.m. a huge wave had hit the boat. Gordon Cook was thrown overboard. But his lifeline pulled him back to the boat. On the ship the water rushed in everywhere. Pumps had stopped working. More water got accumulated. One electric pump was in working order. Gordon Cook had plugged the hole from where the water gushed in. There was no response to the radio messages sent by them for help. On January 6 the Wavewalker came out of the storm. At 6 p.m. a complete outline of the island ‘Amsterdam’ was seen by them.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Talking about the Text
Discuss the following questions with your partner:

Question 1.
What difference did you notice between the reaction of the adults and the children when faced with danger ?
Answer:
There were four adults and two children on board. After the celebration of the Christmas on the Wavewalker the voyagers were quite happy. But their happiness lasted only for a short duration. On January 2 the storm had struck. The screaming sound of wind was painful. The adults did not lose their presence of mind. In order to slow down the speed they dropped the storm jib. Secured everything tightly with ropes. They attached lifelines to their life-rafts. They put on their life skins and life jackets.

They did not panic but comforted and supported each other. Though Gordon Cook was thrown overboard he struggled for survival. He was on the verge of losing consciousness. He felt quite peaceful. His lifeline threw him back on the ship. He had suffered worst injuries. Yet he controlled the steering wheel and was ready for the worst. The crew men pumped out water to keep the ship afloat. When Gordon was taking care of other things his wife Mary, took control of the wheel. The children’s cabin was flooded but they did hope for the best. They told their father that they were alright. Gordon saw that they were terribly injured.

Question 2.
How does the story suggest that optimism helps to endure ‘the direct stress’?
Answer:
Optimism is a circumstance where we look on the brighter side of everything. An optimistic person keeps himself away from fear of failures. To such a person everything is easy to achieve. He deletes the word impossible from his life. He always hopes to succeed in whatever he indulges in. The story ‘We are not afraid to die’ very clearly and boldly prints out this idea. He did not give up his mission only because of his endless courage and optimistic view. He struggled and fought through the storm with unending courage.

He was thrown overboard but when he emerged to the surface he saw the ship being almost capsized. But nature and good fortune revived his optimism. A wave was about to straighten the ship. He held on to the railing which was touching the surface of the water. As the wave hurled her upright he was thrown back into the ship. In spite of worst injuries he survived. This he could achieve only because of optimism and tremendous courage. Every action Gordon Cook indulged in was an example of courage and exposure of the bright side of his life. To the last letter the story gives evidence of optimism and courage.

Question 3.
What lessons do we learn from such hazardous experiences when we are face-to-face with death ?
Answer:
Gordon Cook, Mary his wife, the children and the crewmembers were aware of the fact that anything could happen during the voyage and would prove disastrous. But they were optimistic. They were prepared for the worst. Every minute after the storm had struck they experienced the worst, but did not lose hopes. They had to survive through all their difficulties and dangers bravely.

At the first indication of the impending disaster the voyagers took all the necessary precautions. They were optimistic. When Gordon was thrown over the ship, with the help of the lifeline he was back on board. In spite of worst injuries his hopes for survival did not die down. His determination to face all hazards stood firm. From every action of the voyagers we learn that in spite of coming face to face with death one should not lose hopes but strive to pursue your goals couragiousely.

On asking why she had not reported about her injury, Sue was very bold in answering that she did not want them to be worried. While the parents were playing the major role to protect them, the children in no way proved to be a hindrance. On the contrary they extended a great moral support to the adults.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 4.
Why do you think people undertake such adventurous expeditions in spite of the risk involved ?
Answer:
An adventure is a dangerous and exciting experience. Love of adventure is an innate quality. It is with the person from his birth. Gordon Cook was the descendent of Capt. James Cook, who had taken up round the world voyage 200 years ago. So Gordon had this quality in his blood. Young Swinburn’s climb of Culver Cliff in the isle of Wight is an act of courage. People involve in such acts of courage because of their love for adventure.

This is a nature’s gift to the person. This longing to succeed in life has to be satisfied. One should take precaution that such acts of courage do not harm others. We should not indulge in such activities at the cost of others. The instinct is noble. It strengthens man’s character. It develops in him the qualities of determination. It enlivens their spirit. Gives them endless happiness. Such people should always be encouraged by us. There are risks involved. But such achievements are rare and are never overlooked.

Thinking about Language

Question 1.
We have come across words like ‘gale’ and ‘storm’ in the account. Here are two more words for ‘storm’: typhoon, cyclone. How many words does your language have for ‘storm’ ?
Answer:
In Hindi, ‘storm’ is known as ‘aandhi’, ‘toofan’, ‘andhad’, etc.

Question 2.
Here are the terms for different kinds of vessels: yacht, boat, canoe, ship, steamer, schooner. Think of similar terms in your language.
Answer:
‘Naav’, ‘Nauka’, ‘Jahaaz’ and ‘Kishti’ are some of the various words used in Hindi for the word ‘boat’.

Question 3.
‘Catamaran’ is a kind of a boat. Do you know which Indian language this word is derived from ? Check the dictionary.
Answer:
The word ‘Catamaran’ is derived from Tamil language. The original word is ‘Kattumaram’: Kattu → to tie + mar am → wood, log

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 4.
Have you heard any boatmen’s songs ? What kind of emotions do these songs usually express ?
Answer:
Yes, Boatmen’s songs usually express love and nostalgia. It revolves around the longing to meet a loved one. It may also express their love for the sea.

Working with Words

Question 1.
The following words, used in the text as ship-terminology, are also commonly used in another sense. In what contexts would you use the other meaning?
1. knot
2. stem
3. boom
4. hatch
5. anchor
Answer:
1. knot:
(a) in string/rope : a joint made by tying together two pieces or ends of string, rope, etc. e.g., to tie a knot.

(b) of hair: a way of twisting hair into a small round shape at the back of the head e.g., She had her hair in a loose knot.

(c) in wood : a hard round spot in a piece of wood where there was once a branch.

(d) group of people : a small group of people standing close together e.g., Little knots of students had gathered at the gate’.

(e) of muscles : a tight, hard feeling in the stomach, throat, etc. caused by nerves, ‘ anger, etc. e.g., I could feel a knot of fear in my throat.

2. stem :
(a) serious and often disapproving; expecting somebody to obey you e.g., His voice was stern.
(b) serious and difficult e.g., we faced stern opposition.

3. boom:
(a) In business / economy : a sudden increase in trade and economic activity, a period of wealth and success, e.g., a boom in mobile phone sales.

(b) Popular period, a period when something such as a sport or a type of music suddenly becomes very popular and successful, e.g., The only way to satisfy the cricket boom was to provide more playgrounds.

(c) Sound, a loud deep sound, e.g., the distant boom of the guns.

(d) In river / harbour, a floating barrier that is placed across a river or the entrance . to a harbour to prevent ships or other objects from coming in or going out.

(e) For Microphone, a long pole that carries a microphone.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

4. hatch:
(a) An opening in a wall between two rooms, especially a kitchen and a dining room, through which food can be passed, e.g., a serving hatch.
(b) A door in an aircraft or a spacecraft.
(c) An escape hatch, an opening or a door in a floor or ceiling, e.g., a hatch to the attic.
(d) To make a young bird, fish, insect, etc. come out of an egg.
(e) To create a plan or idea, especially in secret.

5. anchor:
(a) A person or thing that gives somebody a feeling of safety, e.g., the anchor of the family.
(b) To fix something firmly in position so that it cannot move, e.g., make sure the apparatus is securely anchored.
(c) To firmly base something on something else, e.g., Munshi Premchand’s novels are
anchored in rural life.
( d ) To be the person who introduces reports or reads the news on television or radio, e.g., She anchored the evening news for five years.

Question 2.
The following three compound words end in ship. What does each of them mean?
1. airship
2. flagship
3. lightship
Answer:
1. airship : a large aircraft without wings, filled with a gas which is lighter than air, and driven by engines.

2. flagship :
1. The main ship in a fleet of ships in the navy.
2. The most important product, service, building, etc. that an organization owns or produces, e.g., The company is opening a new flagship store in Gurgaon.

3. lightship : a small ship that stays at a particular place at sea and that has a powerful light on it to warn and guide other ships.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 3.
The following are the meanings listed in the dictionary against the phrase ‘take on’. In which meaning is it used in the third paragraph of the account.
take on sth: to begin to have a particular quality or appearance; to assume sth
take sb on: to employ sb; to engage sb to accept sb as one’s opponent in a game, contest or conflict take sb / sth on : to decide to do sth; to allow sth/sb to enter e.g., a bus, plane or ship; to
take sth/sb on board
Answer:
In the third paragraph of the account, ‘take on’ is used in the sense of ‘take sb on’, i.e. ‘to employ sb’; ‘to engage sb’ The words are : ‘We took on two crewmen ………….. to help us ……………. .

Things to Do

Question 1.
Here is a picture of a yacht. Label the parts with the help of the words given in the box:
GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together 1
Answer:
GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together 2

Question 2.
Here is some information downloaded from the internet on lie Amsterdam. You can view images of the isle if you go online.

Location South Indian Ocean, between southernmost parts of Australia and South Africa
Latitude and longitude 37 92 S, 77 67 E
Sovereignty France
Political status notes Part of French Southern and Antarctic Lands
Population 35
Census notes Meteorological station staff
Land area in square kilometres 86

Note : Students will go online and view the images of the isle-Ile Amsterdam.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 3.
Locate Ile Amsterdam on the world map.
Answer:
GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together 3
GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together 4

GSEB Class 12 English We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together Additional Important Questions and Answers

Questions – Answers (Textual)
Answer the following questions in four to five sentences each:

Question 1.
Give a brief description of the narrator’s boat. How had the narrator equipped and tested it ?
Answer:
The narrator’s boat was called ‘Wave- walker’. It was a beautiful 23 metre long, 30 ton wooden-hulled ship. It had been professionally built. They had spent months fitting it out and testing in the roughest weather they could find.

Question 2.
How long did the narrator plan his voyage to last?
Answer:
The narrator had planned his round the world journey to cover 2,55,000 kilometres in three years.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 3.
Whom did the narrator employ and why ? When did he do so ?
Answer:
The narrator employed two crewmen -American Larry Vigil and Swiss Herb Seigler in order to help them tackle the southern Indian Ocean which is known as one of the roughest seas of the world. He engaged them before leaving Cape Town.

Question 4.
How did they celebrate the Christmas holidays ?
Answer:
They were 3,500 kilometres east of Cape Town on 25 December. The weather was very bad. Still they had a wonderful holiday – complete with a Christmas tree. New Year’s Day saw no improvement in weather.

Question 5.
“I had no time to worry about bumped heads,” says the narrator. What problems do you think deserved his immediate attention?
Answer:
The starboard side had been struck open. They were taking in more water with every wave breaking over them. If he did not make some repairs urgently, they would sink. The narrator managed to cover the gaping holes with canvas and waterproof hatch covers.

Question 6.
“I didn’t want to worry you when you were trying to save us all,” said Sue. What has happened to her?
Answer:
Sue’s head had a bump. It had swollen alarmingly. She had two enormous black eyes. She also had a deep cut on her arm. She did not bother her daddy about her injuries as he was busy in more important task.

Question 7.
Why do you think the narrator searched for an island so eagerly?
Answer:
The wave that hit Wavewalker had caused extensive damage. Nearly all the boat’s main frames had been smashed down to the keel. A whole section of the starboard hull was being held up by a few cupboard partitions. Wavewalker could not hold together long enough for them to reach Australia. So he searched for an island to repair the boat.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 8.
How did little Jonathan react to the desperate situation they found themselves in on 5 January?
Answer:
Jonathan asked his daddy if they were going to die. The narrator tried to assure him that they would overcome the situation. Then little Jon declared bravely that he was not afraid of death provided they could all be together.

Question 9.
“Optimism and courage help to tide over difficulties”. How did the narrator succeed in searching the small island ?
Answer:
The narrator was searching for a 65 km wide island in an ocean of 150,000 km. He worked optimistically on wind speeds, changes of course, drift and current. He calculated their position with the help of sextant also.

Question 10.
What gloomy thoughts occurred to the narrator? What pleasant surprise was in store for him?
Answer:
The narrator thought that they might have missed the island. They couldn’t hope to beat back into the westerly winds with the sail they had been left with. When Jonathan called him the best daddy in the world and the best captain and asked for a hug, he refused to do. When Sue remarked that he had found the island, he felt surprised.

Question 11.
Why do you think, did the narrator call lie Amsterdam ’the most beautiful island in the world’ ?
Answer:
Ile Amsterdam was a very small island made of volcanic rock. It had little vegetation and only 28 inhabitants. However, the island provided them safety from the huge waves of the sea as well as opportunity to repair the damaged ship.

Question 12.
How can you say that Suzanne’s injuries were serious ?
Answer:
Suzanne’s head had a bump. It was quite swollen. Her blackened eyes narrowed to slits. Her head injury took six minor operations to remove a recurring blood clot between skin and skull. This shows that her injuries were serious.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Reading Comprehension (Textual)
Read the following passages and select the most appropriate options as answers to the questions given below them:

Question 1.
At dawn on January 2, the waves were gigantic. We were sailing with only a small storm jib and were still making eight knots. As the ship rose to the top of each wave we could see endless enormous seas rolling towards us, and the screaming of the wind and spray was painful to the ears. To slow the boat down, we dropped the stõrm jib and lashed a heavy mooring rope In a loop across the stern. Then we double-lashed everything, went through our life-raft drill, attached lifelines, donned oilskins and life jackets – and waited.

The first indication of impending disaster came at about 6 p.m. with an ominous silence. The wind dropped, and the sky immediately grew dark. Then came a growing roar, and an enormous cloud towered aft of the ship. With horror, I realised that it was not a cloud, but a wave like no other I had ever seen. It appeared perfectly vertical and almost twice the height of the other waves, with a frightful breaking crest.

Questions:
1. ‘We were sailing with only a small jib’. In this sentence, the word shows ……………….
A. distance.
B. time.
C. a sail.
D. a type of boat.
Answer:
C. a sail.

2. ‘…………… and spray was painful to the ears’ means ………………….
A. the sound rising from the spray was too loud.
B. the water of the spray entered the ears and caused great pain.
C. the spray hit very hard causing pain.
D. None of these three
Answer:
A. the sound rising from the spray was too loud.

3. The first indication of impending disaster was ………………
A. severe blowing of wind.
B. terrible lightning.
C. premonitory silence.
D. rising of mountain – like waves.
Answer:
C. premonitory silence.

4. The wave, that the writer had wrongly taken as a cloud, was ……………….
A. twice the height of the other waves.
B. vertically rose over the writer’s ship.
C. broke on the writer’s ship.
D. Both ’A’ and ‘B’
Answer:
D. Both ’A’ and ‘B’

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 2.
Unexpectedly, my head popped out of the water. A few metres away, Wavewalker was near capsizing, her masts almost horizontal. Then a wave hurled her upright, my lifeline jerked taut, I grabbed the guard rails and sailed through the air into Wavewalker’s main boom. Subsequent waves tossed me around the deck like a rag doll. My left ribs cracked; my mouth filled with blood and broken teeth. Somehow, I found the wheel, lined up the stern for the next wave and hung on.

Water, Water, Everywhere. I could feel that the ship had water below, but I dared not abandon the wheel to investigate. Suddenly, the front hatch was thrown open and Mary appeared. “We’re sinking!” she screamed. “The decks are smashed; we’re full of water.” “Take the wheel”, I shouted as I scrambled for the hatch.

Questions:
1. When the head of the writer popped out, he saw…………..
A. his ship turning over.
B. a huge water-snake.
C. the masts of his ship were almost horizontal.
D. Both ‘A’ and ‘C’
Answer:
D. Both ‘A’ and ‘C’

2. The writer got injured as……………
A. his ship was greatly hurled upright.
B. he struck with the mast.
C. he struck with guard rails.
D. he lost his balance.
Answer:
A. his ship was greatly hurled upright.

3. What could the writer not dare to do ?
A. To leave the wheel that he had grabbed.
B. To investigate whether the ship had water below.
C. To help his wife.
D. Both ‘A’ and ‘B’
Answer:
D. Both ‘A’ and ‘B’

4. Mary informed the writer that …………..
A. the next wave was coming.
B. they were out of danger.
C. the decks were smashed and the ship was full of water.
D. she had already grabbed the wheel.
Answer:
C. the decks were smashed and the ship was full of water.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 3.
Somehow I managed to stretch canvas and secure waterproof hatch covers across the gaping holes. Some water continued to stream below, but most of it was now being deflected over the side.

More problems arose when our hand pumps started to block up with the debris floating around the cabins and the electric pump short-circuited. The water level rose threateningly. Back on deck I found that our two spare hand pumps had been wrenched overboard – along with the forestay sail, the jib, the dinghies and the main anchor.

Then I remembered we had another electric pump under the chartroom floor. I connected it to an out-pipe, and was thankful to find that it worked.

Questions:
1. The writer managed to prevent water coming from gaping holes by………………….
A. covering them with his own palms.
B. asking Mary to put something into them.
C. stretching canvas a cross the gaping holes.
D. None of these three
Answer:
C. stretching canvas a cross the gaping holes.

2. More problems occurred when …………………
A. the water coming in could not be prevented at all costs.
B. the hand-pumps started blocking up with the debris.
C. the electric pump short-circuited.
D. Both ‘B’ and ‘C’
Answer:
D. Both ‘B’ and ‘C’

3. What brought the writer a little relief ?
A. Two spare hand-pumps
B. The dinghies
C. The main anchor
D. Another electric pump
Answer:
D. Another electric pump

4. What made the blocking of hand-pumps ?
A. The debris floating around the cabins.
B. The water getting deflected over the side.
C. The short-circuited electric pump.
D. The threateningly rising water level.
Answer:
A. The debris floating around the cabins.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 4.
1 checked and rechecked my calculations. We had lost our main compass and I was using a spare which had not been corrected for magnetic variation. I made an allowance for this and another estimate of the influence of the westerly currents which flow through this part of the Indian Ocean.

About 2 p.m., I went on deck and asked Larry to steer a course of 185 degrees. If we were lucky. I told him with a conviction I did not feel, he could expect to see the island at about 5 p.m.

Then with a heavy heart, I went below, climbed on my bunk and amazingly, dozed off. When I woke it was 6 p.m., and growing dark. I knew we must have missed the island, and with the sail we had left, we couldn’t hope to beat back into the westerly winds.

At that moment, a tousled head appeared by my bunk. “Can I have a hug?” Jonathan asked.
Sue was right behind him.

“Why am I getting a hug now?” I asked.
“Because you are the best daddy in the whole world and the best captain,” My son replied.

Questions:
1. What was not right of the spare compass?
A. It was not checked and rechecked thoroughly.
B. It had not been corrected for magnetic variation.
C. It did not show the exact time.
D. All of these three
Answer:
B. It had not been corrected for magnetic variation.

2. Here the meaning of the phrase ‘make an allowance for’ is …………….
A. To attract attention
B. To relieve somebody from tension
C. To prepare adequately for someone or something
D. To make excuses
Answer:
C. To prepare adequately for someone or something

3. Why was the writer greatly surprised soon after waking up ?
A. He had taken more time in sleep.
B. He had missed the island.
C. He ‘ couldn’t hope to beat back into the westerly winds.
D. None of these three
Answer:
B. He had missed the island.

4. Who is referred to as ‘a tousled head’ ?
A. The narrow sleeping bed.
B. The westerly winds
C. The writer’s son – Jonathan
D. Sue
Answer:
C. The writer’s son – Jonathan

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Grammar

Vocabulary
Fill in the blanks choosing the correct words given in the brackets and write the ? answers only:

Question 1.
(endless, jib, rolling, mooring, gigantic, knots, $ screaming, dropped)
At dawn on January 2, the waves were ………….1………. We were sailing with only a small storm …………2……….. and were still making eight …………3…………. As the ship rose to the top of each
wave we could see …………..4………… enormous seas ………..5…….. towards us, and the …….6…….. of the wind and spray was painful to the ears. To slow l the boat down, we ………..7………….. the storm jib and lashed a heavy ………….8………… rope in a loop across the stern.
Answer:
1. gigantic
2. jib
3. knots
4. endless
5. rolling
6. screaming
7. dropped 8. mooring

Question 2.
(injuries, enormous, worry, alarmingly, made, showed, arm, worry)
Sue’s head had swollen ………….1…………; she had two ………….2……… black eyes, and now she ………….3……….. us a deep cut on her ………….4……….. When I asked why she hadn’t …………5……….. more of her ……….6……….. before this, she replied, “I didn’t want to ………….7……….. you when you were trying to ………….8……….. us all.”
Answer:
1. alarmingly
2. enormous
3. showed
4. arm
5. made
6. injuries
7. worry
8. save

Rectification of Errors
Rectify the errors in the following passages:

Question 1.
On our second day Into Cape Town we began encountering strong gaies. For the first few weeks, they blew continually, Gales did not worry me; but the size of the waves were alarming.
Answer:

Error Correction
into out of
encountering to encounter
first next
were was

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 2.
At dawn on January 2, the waves were gigantic. we were sailed with only a small storm jib and were yet making eight knots. As the ship arose to the top of each wave, we could see endless enormous seas roll towards us.
Answer:

sailed sailing
yet still
arose rose
roll rolling

Question 3.
Larry and Herb were pumping like madmen. Broken timbers hanged at crazy angles, the whole starboard side bulging inwards; cloths, crockery, charts, tins and toys sloshed from in deep water.
Answer:

hanged hung
bulging bulged
cloths clothes
from about

Question 4.
After found a hammer, screws and canvas, I struggled back on deck. From the starboard side bashed open, we were taken water with each wave who broke over us.
Answer:

found finding
from with
taken taking
who that

Question 5.
Sue’s head had swelled alarmingly; she had two enormous black eyes, and now she showed us a dip cut on her arm. While I asked why she hasn’t made more of her injuries before this.
Answer:

swelled swollen
dip deep
while when
hasn’t hadn’t

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Replacing Phrases – Idioms
Choose the correct meanings of the phrases / idioms and rewrite the sentences:

1. I had a rather alarming encounter with a wild pig. (fight, meeting, shooting)
2. We could find no words for what they had done for us. (became speechless, could not shout, could hardly show)
3. He spoke in a very matter-of-fact way about the accident. (confusing, embarrassing, feelingless)
Answer:
1.1 had a rather alarming meeting with a wild pig.
2. We became speechless for what they had done for us.
3. He spoke in a very feelingless way about the accident.

Punctuations
Punctuate the following passages:

Question 1.
In July 1976 my wife Mary son Jonathan 6 daughter Suzanne 7 and I set sail from Plymonth England
Answer:
In July 1976, my wife Mary, son Jonathan, 6, daughter Suzanne, 7, and I set sail from Plymonth, England.

Question 2.
For the longest time Mary and I a 37 year old businessman had dreamt of sailing in the wake of the famous explorer and for the past 16 years we had spent all our leisure time honing our seafaring skills in British waters
Answer:
For the longest time, Mary and I – a 37-year- old businessman – had dreamt of sailing in the wake of the famous explorer, and for the past 16 years, we had spent all our leisure time honing our seafaring skills in British waters.

Question 3.
Water water everywhere I could feel that the ship had water below but I dared not abandon the wheel to investigate Suddenly the front hatch was thrown open and Mary appeared were sinking she screamed
Answer:
Water, water, everywhere. I could feel that the ship had water below, but I dared not abandon the wheel to investigate. Suddenly, the front hatch was thrown open and Mary appeared. “We we’re sinking!” she screamed.

Indirect Narration
Turn the following dialogues into Indirect form of narration:

Question 1.
Gordon : Why you didn’t make more of your injuries before this ?
Sue: I didn’t want to worry you when you were trying to save us all.
Jon : Daddy are we going to die ?
Gordon : Soon we will all make through it.
Answer:
Gordon asked Sue why she hadn’t made more of her injuries before that. Sue responded that she didn’t want to worry him when he had been trying to save them all. Jon , asked his Daddy if they were going to die. Gordon assured him that they would all ‘ make through it.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 2.
Mary : We’re sinking! The decks are smashed. We are full of water.
Gordon : Take the wheel. Are you all right ? Mary: Yes.
Answer:
Mary exclaimed with fear that they were sinking and informed that the decks were smashed and that they (ship) were full of water. Gordon asked her to take the wheel and questioned her if she was all right. To which she responded that she was.

Question 3.
Jonathan : Can I have a hug?
Gordon : Why am I getting a hug now ?
Jonathan: Because you are the best Daddy in the world and the best captain.
Answer:
Jonathan asked Gordon if he could have a hug. Gordon curiously asked why he was getting a hug then. Jonathan replied that he was getting a hug because he (Gordon) was the best Daddy in the world and the best captain.

Question 4.
Gordon: Not today, Jon, I’m afraid.
Sue : Why you must be. You found the island.
Gordon : What!
Sue and Jon: It’s out there in front of us, as big as a battleship.
Answer:
Gordon addrising Jon said politely that not that day. Sue assured him that he must be (the best dad) as he had found the island. Gordon being surprised exclaimed if what they were saying was true. Sue and Jon pointed to the island and informed it was there in front of them, as big as a battleship.

Transformation of Sentences
Rewrite the following sentences as directed:

Question 1.
We had spent months fitting it. (Change the Voice.)
Answer:
Months had been spent by us fitting it.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 2.
Before heading east, we took on two crewmen. (Make It Complex.)
Answer:
Before we headed for the east we took on two crewmen.

Question 3.
Despite atrocious weather we had a wonderful holiday. (Make it Compound.)
Answer:
Weather was atrocious but we had a wonderful holiday.

Question 4.
I remembered we had another electric pump under the chartroom floor. (Make it Simple.)
Answer:
I remembered having another electric pump under the chartered room.

Question 5.
We were getting no replies to our Mayday calls. (Make Affirmative.)
Answer:
We failed to get any replies to our Mayday calls.

Question 6.
If I couldn’t make some repairs, we could surely sink. (Make it Simple.)
Answer:
We had to make repairs to avoid sure sinking.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

Question 7.
As the ship rose to the top of each wave we could see endless enormous seas rolling towards us. (Use ‘no sooner… than’)
Answer:
No sooner did the ship rise to the top of each wave than we could see endless enormous seas rolling towards us.

Question 8.
The best I could determine was that we were somewhere in 150,000 kilometres. (Change the Degree.)
Answer:
No other determination was as good as the determination that we were somewhere in 1,50,000 kilometres.

Question 9.
We found some corned beef and cracker biscuits, and ate our first meal in almost two days. (Begin with ‘having’.)
Answer:
Having found some corned beef and cracker biscuits, we ate our first meal in almost two days.

Question 10.
I realised that it was not a cloud. (Use ‘realised’ as Noun.)
Answer:
It was my realisation that it was not a cloud.

GSEB Solutions Class 11 English Hornbill Chapter 2 We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together

We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together Summary in English

We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together Introduction:
Gordon Cook was born on Dec. 3, 1978 in Toronto. He is a two-time Canadian Olympic sailor. He sails for The Royal Canadian Yacht Club. He is the son of Stephen Cook and Linda Cook. He had great interest in writing stories. He studied at Queen’s University. He is a graduate of Engineering Physics. He was in the University sailing team. He is a descendant of Captain James Cook whose round the earth voyages are popular in the history. After 200 years of Cook’s chain of journeys, the narrator and his little family-wife and two children set sail in July 1976 in their hulled boat Wavewalker from Plymouth.

Alan East was admitted to the Roll of Solicitors in 2003 and has gained extensive experience as a litigator, manager and legal trainer.

We’re Not Afraid to Die… If We Can All Be Together Summary:
The author, his wife Mary two children Suzanne and Jonathan tried to duplicate the round the world voyage in their professional ship ‘The Wavemaker’. There were two crewmen, an American Larry Vigil and a Swiss Herb Seigler. The journey would take 3 years and cover a distance of 2,55,000 km. The first phase of the journey was 1,05,000 km. This was upto Cape Town in South Africa. The second phase consisted of 1,50,000 km. By this time they would reach Australia on 25th Dec. The ‘Wavemaker’ was to be in the southern Indian Ocean by 1977.

The voyage was started in July 1976. Gordon Cook, 37 years old, took his inspiration from captain James Cook about 200 years before. The family went to duplicate the world voyage but were struck by waves, hazardous waves. Their escape is described here. It tells us about the courage and optimism. They exhibited great skill. Death could have swallowed everyone. But they showed exemplary courage and understanding even in the face of death.

New year was celebrated there in Cape Town. But on 2nd January the sea became very stormy. This continued for 3 days. The ship was damaged. The water flew into it. The ship could go down any moment. Each of them showed unusual courage. The waves were huge. The ship rose high with the waves. Every precaution was taken to save lives. The storm became worse. Gordon was badly hurt. At one instance he was thrown overboard. It was his lifeline (rope) that pulled him back into the ship. His left rib was cracked, teeth were broken. Yet he tried to control the ship. The lower deck was smashed. Water rushed in. The sailors tried to pump water out.

His daughter’s head had been hurt. Hand pump was blocked. 2nd electric pump was started. There were big holes in the lower deck. Later they were plugged. They had to keep pumping the water whole night. Radio signals were sent out for help. But there was no response. On 3rd January the water level was under control. 15 hours they had struggled but they survived. It was 4th January. They had been pumping water continuously for 36 hours. No sails could be put up on the main mast. So they hoisted storm jib and continued the voyage to where the two islands were.

On 5th January the situatioh was again horrible. The children’s morale was high. They were not afraid of death. Gordon kept the undamaged side of the ship towards the oncoming waves. Water continued to get into the ship.

On January 6th the Wavemaker had survived through the storm. Gordon kept on looking for the island which was 65 km wide. Sue had experienced head injury. Larry steered the ship to 185°. At 6 a.m. the island of Amsterdam was located. At that time it appeared as if it was the most beautiful island. On the following morning they were cheered by 28 inhabitants of the island.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *